Understanding And Interpreting Corruption Perception Index

Transparency international and corruption perception index is a topic that almost all publications have published. However, it comes to light that very little about the process is known. According to Bruno Fagali little is known about the criteria, the source of information, how the results are explained or even how they get dimensioned. It is, however, vital for one to interpret the published indexes correctly. Understanding the indexes brings out elements necessary for the interpretation of the results.

As Bruno Fagali explains, the ranking does not define the measure of corruption in a nation accurately. Instead, it’s a ranking that gives the equivalent of the perception. As the name perception suggests, it’s not subjective. Instead, it’s equated to a feeling. Something not concrete. Then, how do Transparency International do to arrive at the publicized index? Let it be known that they don’t employ people to collect people’s perceptions on the streets. Instead, the data collected comes from three renowned institutions. The three institutions research for two years by conducting interviews and studies. The interviews may involve perceptions of the public sector in regards to corruption. The collected data is then sampled and compiled to produce the final result.

Read more on ibdee.org.br

There are several points to note;

One, the research is carried out by different institutions. The commonly known include AFDB, World Bank, and the World Economic Forum. However, they may not research every country. For example, the geographical location of AFDB gives it an added advantage when conducting interviews in Africa.

The second point states that one country can have several institutions conducting research. At times, you will find nine different institutions conducting research. Brazil had eight different research while Poland had ten. While conducting the study, the institutions employ different methodologies.

Bruno Fagali continues to highlight that different methodologies come with different questions. The questions may range from the process of government nominations and appointments to general issues such as bribery. They may also involve academics, their experts, and even the general public.

Despite the indexes ratings, information supporting them is subjective and collected heterogeneously. Also, daily reports have a significant influence on the individuals conducting the research.

Bruno Fagali is a legal counsel and corporate integrity expert. He is based in Brazil and contributes to the cleaning of public contracts through integrity campaigns. He runs a private law firm (FAGALI Advocacy). His experience ranges from administrative law to regulatory law. Bruno Fagali is a graduate of Law from the Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo.

Check more about Bruno Fagali: http://www.meioemensagem.com.br/home/comunicacao/2016/05/30/acho-saudavel-que-haja-revisao-de-contratos-diz-bob-vieira.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *